A Series of Gentle Shark Attacks


Dan Nuttall
A Series Of Gentle Shark Attacks (Nov. 13, 2016)
acrylic on wood panel
10 x 10″

I like to alternate more “serious” work with drawing and painting “exercises” that keep me limber and light. And, as with most of my work, I don’t always know where the art is headed. Painting is an act of bringing into being, of invention; a combination of intention, randomness and explicitness, accidents and purpose. Sometimes a single stroke of the brush is enough to make a painting depart in a entirely new direction. It is usually in retrospect, occasionally days, often months later, that intention and meaning come to the surface. And in the tradition of surprises in the process of “art-making” there can be reversals and revisions; light things can become heavy, slow things can have great mass, gentle things can be savage. Thus, it seems to me that these small paintings are about the last five days and my despondency over the electing of President Trump – who seems determined to gently, casually, chew away at the fabric of U.S. society.

#Trump #sharks #POTUS

You can find out more about Dan Nuttall and his art HERE

His current solo exhibition at Lee Contemporar Art HERE.

Dan Nuttall art painting a series of gentle shark attacks


Anna Ostoya, Kathy Griffin, Judith and Holofernes: Who Gets to Show?

ANNA OSTOYA, Slaying, 2016
KATHY GRIFFIN, Slayed, 2017

Anna Ostoya SLAYING web


In 2016 I had the pleasure of viewing Anna Ostoya’s exhibition SLAYING at Bortolami Gallery in Chelsea, NYC. Here is a quote from the gallery’s press materials:
“Bortolami is pleased to announce Slaying, Anna Ostoya’s third exhibition at the gallery. In her new paintings and photomontages, the artist deploys Artemisia Gentileschi’s iconic work, Judith Slaying Holofernes, as an image of violence inherent in art and in life. The original painting depicts the story of Judith, a Jewish widow who saves her people besieged by the Assyrian army. With the help of her maidservant, she plies Holofernes, the army general, with alcohol and then beheads him in his drunken state.
In these new paintings, Ostoya inspects the crime scene, analyzing it through geometrical abstraction. She substitutes Judith for Holofernes, in Judith Slaying Judith, and Holofernes for Judith, in Holofernes Slaying Holofernes. Each figure attacks itself. These large canvases are accompanied by smaller ones where the artist further analyzes the scene.”


When, where, why is it appropriate to show a human being getting decapitated? Who gets to articulate, investigete, dramatize or commit such acts?

You can read about ANNA OSTOYA and her work here: https://www.artsy.net/artist/anna-ostoya

About her BORTOLAMI exhibition here: http://bortolamigallery.com/exhibitions/slaying/

And about KATHY GRIFFIN: everywhere.

And about me here: http://dandoesdesign.com/