Red is…

“The reek of human blood smiles out at me” Aeschylus

A recent call for submissions put forward by Propeller Gallery in Toronto asked artists to contemplate the colour red. Timed to open on Valentine’s Day the show, titled “Red Impulse” (February 14 – March 4, 2018), left the door wide open for interpretation, the call for submission noting that red could be… “…crimson, vermilion and scarlet, the colour of extremes, communism, liberalism, powerful, violent and bloody, love and passion, fast, STOP, sweet, hot and spicy, bold, bashful, the SUN, cautious and above all…impulse”. In this blog I’m taking an inventory of sorts – a walk through the reds of memory lane.

I have always equated intense oranges and reds with the paintings of Francis Bacon and the ability of his work to act “…directly [upon] the nervous system”, to “open up the valves of sensation”. Red activates, stimulates, is a diving board. Painting happens mid-air.

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Dan Nuttall, “Red Portrait 2”, oil pastel on paper, private collection.

Red can be sinister or macabre, alluding to events that have never happened. Or might.

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Dan Nuttall, “The Tub”, digital photograph, unpublished.

Red can float, be vaporous, toxic and tremulous. Red can discharge.

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Dan Nuttall, “Red Cloud”, acrylic on canvas, private collection.

Red can signal, exclaim, pronounce and pounce. Red can pull us off course.

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Dan Nuttall, “The Red Nest”, oil pastel on paper.

Red can dazzle, dance, trick. Red can lure, vanish and sneak up behind us.

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Dan Nuttall, “Hummingbird Gorget”, 4 x 6″ each, acrylic on paper, available.

Red can be adjacent, sitting next to bone, skin and scrapes.

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Dan Nuttall, “Grater and vertebrae”, lost.

Red can be political, isolating, terse and playful.

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Dan Nuttall, “Fifty Stars and a Maple Leaf”, 45 x 762″, acrylic on wood panel, available.

Red can be remote, automatic, whirring and mindless. Red can be a button.

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Dan Nuttall, “War Machine 3”, acrylic on paper, framed, available.
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Dan Nuttall, “War Machine 4”, acrylic on paper, framed, available.

Both War Machine 3 and 4 above are currently available and are framed. You can see more of my work HERE.

You can find out more about Propeller Gallery’s RED IMPULSE show in Toronto, February 14 – March 4, 2018,  HERE.

OPENING RECEPTION at Propeller Gallery is Thursday, February 15th, 6:30-9:30.

War Machine 4, above, will be on exhibit as part of the RED IMPULSE group show at Propeller Gallery so please drop by and see this painting as well as the diverse takes on this stimulating theme by an incredibly accomplished group of artists. The Drake Hotel is nearby as are many other Queen Street West venues so you can make a night of it.

You can also follow me on:

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/dandoesdesign/

HAPPY  VALENTINE’S  DAY!

 

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Cool Blue Art : A Form of Air Conditioning?

As Toronto heads into its first heat wave of the summer we are all thinking of ways to stay cool.

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Dan Nuttall, NORTHERN LANDSCAPE

When looking at art, particularly larger scale mostly monochromatic art, viewers often dismiss the simplicity of the work and regard the large expanses of colour as meaningless. Think of the work of Rothko or Newman and the often uttered comment that “I could do that at home”. But what are we missing? When we take the time to look at Rothko’s or Newman’s larger bodies of work, and we consider the fact that colour fields and colour combinations affect us psychologically and physiologically, a more nuanced interpretation of the works can emerge.

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Dan Nuttall, BONE STREAM, (1 of 4)

The role of colour is often thought of in psychological terms meaning colour is interpreted symbolically through learning. For example, green is considered lucky for some cultures while in others it signifies royalty . Red signals attention and alarm or excitement. While psychological interpretation varies from culture to culture, actual physiological responses occur and may tend to be more universal in humans – though there is still considerable variability. How do we begin to examine the relationship between colour and physiological response? In physiological terms the eye transmits electrical impulses to the hypothalamus in the brain which in turn governs our hormones and our endocrine system. More specifically, the hypothalamus governs:

  • water regulation
  • sleeping and behavioural patterns
  • sexual and reproductive functions
  • metabolism
  • appetite
  • body temperature

 

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Dan Nuttall, POLAR BEAR CUB ON ICE FLOE

Think about the powerful role that colour plays in non-human animals, particularly in relation to mating rituals and the signalling of reproductive readiness. We humans, animals all of us, are also affected by colour.  Have you ever wondered about the effect that colour might have on your physiology? Can blue really cool?

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Dan Nuttall, LAKE HURON EDGE

In California, bubble gum pink is used to calm children at a detention centre. In neonatal wards blue light is used as a treatment for premature babies born with jaundice. Color can change the perceived taste of food. Color affects blood pressure, pulses and respiration rates and brain activity and biorhythms.

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Dan Nuttall, CHATHAM, MASSACHUSETTS SUNSET

Blue is the world’s favourite colour, so a work of art with a preponderance of blue has a better chance of being liked that one of yellow. Green is a close second. The blues and greens of water and vegetation begin to explain some of the popularity of  landscape paintings. Research indicates that when people feel hot they prefer looking at blues and greens. Additional research on the physiology of colour effects indicates that blue helps people heal by soothing them – a greater portion of the energy directed towards day to day activities can be re-directed towards healing when a person is calm. Finally, “Through associations with the sky, the ocean and water, most people associate blue with openness, peace and tranquility,” says Zhu, who conducted the research with UBC PhD candidate Ravi Mehta. “The benign cues make people feel safe about being creative and exploratory. Not surprisingly it is people’s favourite colour.”

It’s a heat wave Toronto – so stay calm while enjoying the benefits of blue!

Need to be cooled by art in Toronto this summer? Go see the Art Gallery of Ontario’s “The Idea of North: The Paintings of Lawren Harris” which has been curated by Actor/Writer Steve Martin.

More colourful art by dandoesdesign and more cooling blue art by Dan Nuttall in the on-line exhibition “Other Ideas of North” HERE.

 

 

Nature Via Nurture: What The Painting Saw

I admit to being genetically and socially constructed – though much like author Matthew Ridley, I see “nature” as via “nurture”. By this mean that our environments can affect gene expression and nature and nurture work collaborate to create outcomes.

I grew up in a culture that shaped how I participate. I spent less time in the gym and team sports because I didn’t want to be undressing with the other boys. It was my attraction to them that drove me away – my true nature would not be nurtured in such an environment.

Often, when I am working on art, I am working “automatically”, in what I call stream of consciousnesses. You can see my art HERE and on FB HERE.  To me, the work is proceeding “instinctively” but I know that the pall of previous and present experiences are there as well. I recently visited the Brooklyn Museum and turned a corner to find Monet’s “Vernon In The Sun” (1894), confronting my nature, nurturing my gaze.

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Claude Monet, “Vernon In The Sun”, 1894, Brooklyn Museum

I have conversations with friends and make “pacts” with myself that will challenge me as an artist. While in New York recently, and knowing I would be gallery-hopping, I challenged myself to “re-consider a knee-jerk negative reaction to a piece of art”.

I was set to pass by “Vernon In The Sun” – with its sweet indistinct colours. I murmured some kind of negative reaction and proceeded around the corner to something more to my liking. You could literally hear my shoes squeal when I realized what I was doing. I walked back, prepared to confront the piece. It stared right back.

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Sweet Array of Colours by Dan Nuttall

It was the overall colour scheme, the “sweet colours” in red, pink and baby blue. It was the indistinct-ness of the whole – my eye had to work to delineate shapes and identify objects. It was going to take time and did I not have more important quarry? All set to interpret and tell this painting what it was, I realized that it was reading me. Nurturing me. Being diagnostic. Here’s what the painting saw:  a hurried, dismissive individual who wanted clarity, and bold contrast to help him organize his thoughts so he could “get it” and move on. Yikes, I was being “read” by a painting. The Brooklyn Museum‘s web-site describes the painting, in part, as follows:

          “In this instance, hazy sunshine blurs the Gothic church’s carved details as well as the distinction between architecture and foliage, river and bank. Monet thickly and uniformly brushed undifferentiated strokes of pale purple, pink, blue, and green across his canvas, creating a dry, encrusted surface”.

I thought about the painting on the subway as I returned to Brooklyn for the evening. And I thought about my own censorship and the blushing, candied paintings I had thrown away over the years. Here’s an example:

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And the same again, but more consistent with the art I tend to release:

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I think they make a beautiful pair.

My work will be on display at The Artist Project, February 18-21, 2016, at the Better Living Centre at Exhibition Place. Please drop by Booth 105 and say hello!