Outdoor Art : A Papel Picado Inspired by Mexico

 

We have spent considerable time in the Yucatan, Mexico. In that region almost any celebration results in the hanging of strings of “banderas de papel” called “banderitas” or, if referring to the traditional form of this art form, ”papel picado”, meaning “pecked paper”. I’ve always loved this idea of pecking and it brought to mind the many forms of “making” in birds. The pecking refers to the use of small metal chisels or blades that are struck with hammers to excise the open areas of the flags. The flags are piles in stacked layers and a pattern guide is used to ensure consistency across a large number of banderas. Tap, tap, tap, a flower blooms. Tap, tap, tap, a grinning skull takes shape. In our current times the flags are made of plastic.

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During our time in the #Yucatan Peninsula, #Mexico we could often hear the calls of the Ferruginous Pygmy #Owl. I used oil pastels to create this work on paper, celebrating the indominitable spirit of this small bird which is also, reportedly, an aggressive predator.

 

One day I came across a large rolled vinyl sign in the dumpster of a car dealership – about 5 feet in width and 20 feet long. It wasn’t long before I had this coiled languid tongue slung over my shoulder and, as many artists can relate to, I immediately felt both triumphant and apprehensive. One the one hand I had new art materials obtained at a great price. On the other hand I was wondering – where was I going to store it and what was I going to do with it? I had absolutely no idea. I counted on the fact that of the thousands of ideas constantly flowing through my head, one of them would stumble across a large vinyl log one day and fall face first into “art”. The coiled vinyl sign lay dormant, gathering dust for nearly two years.

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Dan Nuttall, #CACTUS MOB, acrylic on canvas, 36 x 48″

 

The finishing of our new back yard this summer was a cause for celebration, we did all the design and implementation work ourselves. I thought of a party with small colourful “banderitas” but was daunted by the thought of finding and stringing a series of suspended lines in the back yard. Since art was always going to a part of our back yard, and space in downtown Toronto is always at a premium, I thought that a single large “papel picado” might suffice. It could occupy the far wall, serve as a focal point and lend an air of celebration and diversity to the setting. I would use the back of the vinyl sign as the front face, providing a thin white surface.

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Process: I created a digital drawing, printing it on letter sized paper (42 separate pages), taped them together and taped the completed image to the back of the repurposed vinyl banner.

It took a month to produce the flag including a week of cutting by hand with a small blade. The flow of memories in the form of plants and garden and insects kept my mind alive: zebra long-wing butterflies, cardboard palms, black-eyed susan vines, night blooming cactus, ginger plants, Plumeria. The content is all farmed from memory. Plants you see in the flag are actual species, done without further research, to the best of my memory as are the two owls called Ferruginous Pygmy Owls which we have often heard while in the greener areas of the city. The butterflies, owls and cactus have all been the subject of separate works of art.

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It took about 40 hours to excise all the tiny section within the papel picado (“pecked paper”). 

And so the “bandera de vinilo gigante ”, the “large vinyl flag”, has now come into being. Retrieved from the landfill, memories extracted, pecked from time. I feel like celebrating. Loteria!!

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The final artwork is 55 x 77″, made from material diverted from landfill, takes up little space and turns our back yard into a gallery. Also weather-proof though not approved for climbing critters!

You can see more of my work here: http://www.dandoesdesign.com

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HYDROLOGY : Art Reflects Change and Resilience in Toronto’s Gay Village

It’s not far from here, in 2016, that Black Lives Matter took a stand on the gay pride march and the participation of City of Toronto police. Within the same distance the body of a murdered young woman, Tess Richey, was discovered in 2017 in the outdoor stairwell of a Church Street building. More recently, the community has been rocked by the murders of men, all targeted by an alleged serial killer who is now in custody. To say the least, the last few years have been challenging and un-nerving for Toronto’s gay village. Toronto artist Dan Nuttall is creating art that reflects on these trying times. “I wanted to use nature to express the complexity of connection and change as well as resilience and optimism”.

 

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Dan Nuttall “Bruised Cloud”, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 40, diptych, available.

 

The art is on display in “The Window”, a storefront art gallery operated by ONE Properties at 558 Church Street, just a few feet from the Church and Wellesley intersection. The art is on display from August 28 – October 2, 2018.

At first glance the three paintings in Nuttall’s show “Hydrology” seem to bear little relation to the complex issues facing this community. Two of the paintings capture clouds (“Thunder Cloud” and “Bruised Cloud”) and the other a stream (“Broad Stream”). On closer inspection however the metaphoric aspects of the works begin to relate more broadly – to personal and community cultural contexts. How is a cloud like a person? In his artist statement Nuttall says this: “Our celestial selves are made of light stuff – tiny things that come together to make us visible, make us feel solid, make us feel separate and distinct. Floating through life, it seems clear sailing. As much as we are able to see from our unique vantage points, we cannot see the small things rushing toward us nor observe their incorporation into our selves. Over time, small things accumulate and condense, are rendered visible and given form. An outburst allows part of the self to detach and return to the ground from whence it came. Turbulence keeps us aloft. Dialogue is a goddess of small exchanges.”

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Dan Nuttall, “Thunder Cloud”, acrylic on canvas, 39 x 47″, available

For Nuttall, incorporating the perspective of Black Lives Matter in the gay pride parade was a necessary way for the queer community to move forward, a way to change, a way to have turbulence keep the political aspects of queer and black culture alive: “I’m a product of the era of AIDS activism and I vividly remember the need for the political acts of groups like ACT UP in New York City. Who can forget “Silence = Death” and the confrontations that precipitated so much awareness?”

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Dan Nuttall, “Broad Stream”, acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20″ each image, available

The themes of connection, changefulness and resilience are present again in his stream painting which is a quadriptych – the stream has been separated across four separate canvases – and requires the viewer to stitch together the stream in their mind, which Nuttall refers to as “an ecological act”. Again, Nuttall is again echoing the themes found in the cloud paintings but also pointing to something else – seeing nature as a source of peace, of healing and inspiration. “Nature is where we can seek healing and peace and for many it is a source of the mystical. For the queer community the last few years have meant challenging ourselves, re-embracing activism and the political, and dealing with new threats”.

Writing about his “stream” series of paintings, Nuttall states: “The emanations found in the paintings of artists like Emily Carr and Charles Burchfield used calligraphic brushstrokes to symbolize the unseen or unknown. Light, sound and the presence of a greater power float within their scenes of nature. In these paintings of streams the emanations, as crescent-shaped blades of white, draw our attention to nature, to the “in-between” of nature, and then beyond to the unknown and unseen. Life, as subatomic, both light particle and wave, illustrating the engine, the power, the mystery that drives it all.” In this moment, at this time, located at the crossroads of the queer village, these paintings both speak and listen.

You can find more of this artist’s work at: www.dandoesdesign.com

You can read about The Window gallery here: http://thewindow558.com/

Dan Nuttall may be reached at: dandoesdesign@hotmail.com

Stilled Life With Curriculum : Art Responds to Ontario’s Sex Education Curriculum Controversy

In Ontario, Canada, the introduction of a new sexual education curriculum has caused considerable controversy. You can find recent news coverage regarding this issue HERE and HERE.

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This art installation by Canadian artist Dan Nuttall intervenes by holding a mirror up to this controversy. On top of the desk sit “bivalves” on a silver serving tray. The bivalves, made of cast concrete, have shells cast from twinned jockstrap cups. Inside the shadowed wood school desk interior, but visible to the observer, sits a shucking knife. The knife sits on top of overlapping “graffiti” – statements made by those who oppose the new sexual education curriculum.

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You can read statements by those who oppose this new curriculum HERE.

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The desk and its contents sit in dialogue with a large, offset rectangle on a nearby wall – a chalkboard.

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This work was exhibited at Roadside Attractions in Toronto, Ontario in the Fall of 2017 from August 2 to September 13.  Roadside Attractions, a long-standing art venue in Toronto, no longer exists, though there are plans to mount this installation elsewhere. If you are interested in exhibiting or purchasing this art installation you can contact the artist.

Dan Nuttall is a visual artist who works primarily in painting and installation. You can see his work at: http://www.dandoesdesign.com/

Or visit him on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/torontoartist/

 

The Dreaming Bear, Ursus oneiros

Painting by Dan Nuttall of Ursus oneiros

For some time now I have been interested in the “level” playing field created through the use of the terms “human-animal” and “non-human animal”. Here, the level playing field is the consistent use of the term animal.

Related to this is another idea, that of  hierarchy in relation to dimensions of sustainability (e.g., political, economic, social, cultural, ecological), specifically the fact that the ecological dimension or “ecology” trumps the economical dimension or “economy”. Example: you can have ecology without economy but you can’t have economy without ecology. Ecology trumps economy. Taken together the above two ideas can be combined as follows: in a finite world with ever shrinking resources all animals will ultimately be subjected to ecological constraints, however those constraints arise.

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Ursus oneiros (Dreaming Bear) by Dan Nuttall, acrylic on wood panel, 36 x 48″ SOLD

As an artist and ecologist I see competition for space, the attributes and qualities of space, and the inputs and outputs of space as critical aspects of the global discussion about which animals and what kinds of spaces will survive. Such questions are independent of the debate about whether or not animals should be kept in captivity as, ultimately, ALL animals will face shrinking spaces, lower quality inputs (tainted food, water, air, vegetation), increased competition, and decreased access to mates (habitat fragmentation, forest destruction). The questions of “zoo” are also the questions of “planet”.

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Dan Nuttall, “Shore Lines”, acrylic on wood panel, 4 x 8′

Which leads me to displaced animals in compressed life history volumes such as zoo exhibits. In a previous post on this blog, titled “The Mind Is A Zoo“, which addressed the painting shown above, I stated that the “…oneiric state of the painting provides an overarching serenity linking both the familiar and the strange. One wonders what animals dream when they are born in captivity and exposed solely to a single environment. Is there still something deep and rudimentary that can arise from a genetic or shared consciousness? Some archetypical memory?

In other words, can a bear dream of a forest if it has never seen one? If the dreams can only be comprised of things the bear has seen and experienced in its own lifetime does that mean the bear dreams only of the exhibit space and anything it may see from it? Does containment matter if one is born into it? Or, is it possible that the collective unconscious of the bear includes the hard wired dream of a leaping salmon and outstretched paw? And if the bears disappear who will keep this dream? Where can it be stored? And if the dream disappears can it ever be dreamed again?

Non-human animal sensing, experience and memory are components of non-human animal culture. In ecological terms this culture has four cornerstone requirements: food, water, hiding cover and mates. Even if these requirements are being met in what seems to be large unrestricted spaces or conservation areas the lack of any one of them or a reduction in the quality of any one of them can impoverish non-human animal culture and lead to population decreases and extinction. In this sense what we think of as “habitat” becomes the cage. In other words – thinking that non-human animals are “out there” in the “wild” and are “safe” is really just an illusion.

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Dan Nuttall, “Habitat Is The Cage”, acrylic on wood, 30 x 40″

Links to other posts in this blog on the subject of ecological art, non-human animals, otherness, animal sensing and animals and space HERE and HERE and HERE.

The painting above “Habitat Is The Cage” will be shown at Gallery 1313 in Toronto June 21-July 1, 2018, as part of the “Eco-Art 2018” exhibition curated by Phil Anderson. Like all of the other paintings in this post the lineworks or line patterns you see have been taken from abandoned polar bear exhibits at the Stanely Park Zoo in Vancouver, British Columbia.

 

Below, from the same series, but not focussing on bears but the Family Canidae, is “Future Ghost (Canidae)” which addresses domestication as both a form of erasure and conservation.

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Future Ghost (Canidae), acrylic on wood panel, 16 x 16″

More of my art work can be seen HERE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ten Thoughts You Should Be Having About Non-Human Animals…

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1. Human and non-human animals live in a finite world. Whether the oceans the sky or a landmass, there is only so much space. The human animal is an effective competitor and has a continually expanding population. As the human animal population expands it collapses the volumes within which non-human animals live. This displaces non-human animals. As such, all non-human animals live in continually shrinking spaces. The art below explores the relationship between ravens and glass. What are the implications of the anthropogenic, material world and non-human animals?

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Raven and Mirror (1 of 4), acrylic on canvas, 16 x 20″ (SOLD)

 

2. All spaces occupied by non-human animals are designed (affected) by humans. The spaces occupied by non-human animals have a variety of names: zoo exhibit, conservation area, protected area, island. These spaces have “inputs” and “outputs”. Regardless of name or designation zoo exhibits and conservation areas are the same – designed and shrinking spaces, with controlled quantity and quality of inputs and outputs, and a finite number of non-human animals that can be supported. The art below creates a mini-drama to provoke questioning: Why are 3 birds approaching a nest? Why is it empty? What happens next? What do we know about the lives of these “others”? 

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3 Birds Approaching An Empty Nest, acrylic on paper, 11 x 15″ each

 

3. Animals can thus occupy displaced ecologies or in situ ecologies. In situ ecologies, for the time being, require less intervention from human animals to maintain. A green roof, a fish tank, a zoo exhibit are all displaced ecologies. The care and maintenance of displaced ecologies require more resources than in situ (connected) ecologies. The painting below uses forms taken from abandoned polar bear exhibit to mimic landscapes. What is a “real” landscape? What is a “fake” landscape? What effects do artificial landscapes and containment have on the psychology and evolution of non-human animals? Are all conservation spaces really just zoos?

 

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Mimesis 3, acrylic on wood panel, 36 x 36″

 

4. Human animals control the quantity and quality of inputs and outputs for non-human animal habitats. In a sense all animal spaces have “bars” that regulate – some things are kept out and some things are allowed through. Water is one of the resources that moves between the anthropogenic “bars” that divide landscapes. But if this resource is corrupted it means that the corruption flows along with it. What language is required to help us “read” the value of water? What symbols and signs can we perceive when we comes to understanding or approaching nature? Is perception without action of any value? Does all nature have to become “symbolic” to be “counted”?

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Dan Nuttall, “Symbolic Stream 1”

 

5. If the quality of input is less than optimal for a given non-human animal species this is a form of “competition”. Pollution is a form of competition. Waste is a form of competition. Noise is a form of competition. The photograph below is an art povera found object moment referencing the recent spate of whales dying from ingested plastic.  The “poverty” here is very real – non-human animals are impoverished by many of our human activities. The “found” aspect is really about the “discarded” – waste is a form of competition.

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Dan Nuttall “Whale Intestine” 2018

 

 

6. Ultimately, all non-human animals will be faced with extinction, captivity or domestication. Here, the organic curve and resplendent colours of a reef are juxtaposed against the rectinilear shadows of urbanity.

 

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Dan Nuttall, 2018, “Coral Reef” diptych, 18 x 24″ each

 

7. When engaged in competition human animals usually choose themselves over non-human animals. In this series I used clouds as a metaphor for the “self”. Our heritage as a species allows us to float above the landscape, in dynamic tension with the hydrological cycle. We shift and change shape taking up evaporating water molecules only to have them condense to be released back to the earth. Can something like a cloud – so light and airy – be bruised?

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Dan Nuttall, “Bruised Cloud”, acrylic on canvas, 18 x 48″

8. We are all animals and subject to the laws of ecology. The world can survive without economy but it cannot survive without ecology. Ecology trumps economy. Below, the inverted sky, and sea with melting ice, are intersected by a meat bridge where only three of the four legs of a polar bear can be seen. What is this bear “worth”? What is its “value”?

 

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Dan Nuttall, “Habitat Is The Cage”, acrylic on wood panel, 30 x 40″

 

9. Given the above the issues relevant to zoos and “captivity” are the same for “the wild” and conservation areas. Human animals need to think more holistically and along longer time frames. Icebergs, taken from the iconic Canadian “Group of Seven” painter Lawren Harris’s work, exist against a hazy sky while a loon sinks into the depths – escaping but connected.  

 

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Diving Loon, acrylic on wood panel, 16 x 16″

 

10. The number and diversity of non-human animals should be viewed as positive correlate of the probability of human animal survival. These dodos are derived from a skeleton seen at the Smithsonion Museum in Washington, D.C., about the same time I discovered I was, in part, of aboriginal ancestry. My family had erased or rendered this aspect of my life extinct. The rift between what we think versus who we really are can obfuscate meaning. Our collective distancing from ecological truths needs to be shrunk.

 

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Extinction Is A Won War (Dodos), acrylic on paper, 30 x 40″ each, SOLD

 

You can read more about my thoughts regarding non-human animals, and explore my art in relation to this topic HERE, or my ecological art HERE and HERE.

 

My web site is dandoesdesign.

 

 

Giving Men Flowers: A Pansy for Jocks

In the wake of current events such as the Harvey Weinstein debacle and the #metoo campaign I catch myself thinking about the progress that needs to be made. And as an artist I wonder – what is the role of art? To ensure the equal representation of women and all “others” as administrators and creators of art but also to provide – to guarantee – a setting free from prejudice, threat and harrassment. And what of artworks themselves – what are they saying?

In sports, many aspects of “maleness” are underpinned by “femaleness”. Some men acknowledge these underpinnings while others eschew them. I find it hard to ignore femininity in a world of spandex, padding, cups, straps, clips and girdles. In and of themselves these design “elements” are “neutral” – materials, shapes, degrees of rigidity, support, protection and wicking. Historically, these neutral design elements have been sexualized when it comes to men thinking about of women. However, it is anathema to most men to think of them as erotic when applied to other males, especially in the locker room. In the gay world all these suspensory elements are celebrated – exploited as “hyper-male”. Many a well-swung gay fantasy has rotated around the fulcrum of a jock strap.

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Dan Nuttall, “Pansy For Jocks 1”, photography and digital manipulation

How is it that we fetishize in both positive and negative ways inert elements attached to human bodies? Here, in this piece, the strange attractor of flower, as pansy, draws the inquisitive bee of attraction in, offers its stigma, styles and ovaries. And releases the bee to rejoin its community.

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Dan Nuttall, “Pansy For Jocks 2”, photography and digital manipulation

 

In the male sports world I wonder if misogyny, homophobia, transphobia and the failure of men to accept “feminine” attributes contributes to violence against others and shaming of the self. This art asks men to question their relationships with their “self” and the “feminine” in the arena of sport. This art invites men to comment – but they rarely ever do. This art invites men to consider the constraints they offer to their partners, their children, their communities when they see the world as narrowly defined. This art asks men to accept femininity, to revel in it, to champion it all of the petals that make up this flower. This art invites women to send it to men they know and ask them what they think of it.

How would men respond to a world where art invited them to be more open minded? These pansies are comprised of jock strap cups and hockey girdle straps and clips. A pair, in black and white, would look great above your bed or in your living room where guests might comment. Erotic art that honours the continuum, not just the poles. Can anyone have a convincing and comprehensive strength if they cannot accept and appreciate the full spectrum of gender expression, of masculine and feminine, of weak and strong?

A gift of flowers is always appropriate, I offer these pansies to jocks and invite you to offer them too, in any form of your making.

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Dan Nuttall, “Pansy For Jocks 3”, photography and digital manipulation.

I was so very pleased that “Pansy For Jocks 1” was selected by jury to auctioned off on March 30, 2017, in support of the Aids Committee of Toronto. You can read about ACT and the amazing work they do here: http://www.actoronto.org/.

“Pansy for Jocks 3” will be auctioned off on March 22, 2018 for the same amazing ACT-SNAP event! This work was awarded one of 5 prestigious Awards of Merit by the Jury, who reviewed the works anonymously. The prize includes $500 and a ticket to the Gala Auction evening. The jury for 2018 included:

  • Cheryl Powers – Photographic Artist (Chair)
  • Chantal Stepa – Co-Chair
  • Jeannie Baxter – Managing Director, Toronto Image Works
  • Aidan Cowling – Photographic Artist and Head of Communications & Development, Gallery 44
  • Erika DeFreitas – Multidisciplinary Artist
  • Kevin Kelly – Commercial and Art Photographer
  • Patrick Lightheart – Designer and Artist

SNAP! 2018 is a Contemporary Photo Competition. A juried competition for all photographers, there are cash prizes for top entries. Selected images will be included in the SNAP! 2018 silent auction, part of Toronto’s most exciting gala celebrating contemporary art photography. This year’s gala takes place March 22, 2018, at the Bram + Bluma Appel Salon at the Metro Toronto Reference LIbrary, you can read about this venue here: http://salonrentals.torontopubliclibrary.ca/about-the-refe…/

There is a PREVIEW night for the Curatorial Collection of photorgaphs as well as those photorgaphs receivign Awards of Merit. The preview runs March 8, 9, 10, at Robert Birch Gallery in Toronto, more info here: http://birchcontemporary.com/

You can see this year’s winners on the web site for SNAP, here: http://snap-toronto.com/

Please share this post if you have a moment to support this critical agency. ACT provides support services that empower men, women and young people living with HIV to achieve self-determination, informed decision-making, independence, and overall well-being. ACT does this through programs such as counselling, information provision, social support activities and programs that help people with HIV return to work.

You can see my larger body of work here: http://www.dandoesdesign.com/

 

Red is…

“The reek of human blood smiles out at me” Aeschylus

A recent call for submissions put forward by Propeller Gallery in Toronto asked artists to contemplate the colour red. Timed to open on Valentine’s Day the show, titled “Red Impulse” (February 14 – March 4, 2018), left the door wide open for interpretation, the call for submission noting that red could be… “…crimson, vermilion and scarlet, the colour of extremes, communism, liberalism, powerful, violent and bloody, love and passion, fast, STOP, sweet, hot and spicy, bold, bashful, the SUN, cautious and above all…impulse”. In this blog I’m taking an inventory of sorts – a walk through the reds of memory lane.

I have always equated intense oranges and reds with the paintings of Francis Bacon and the ability of his work to act “…directly [upon] the nervous system”, to “open up the valves of sensation”. Red activates, stimulates, is a diving board. Painting happens mid-air.

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Dan Nuttall, “Red Portrait 2”, oil pastel on paper, private collection.

Red can be sinister or macabre, alluding to events that have never happened. Or might.

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Dan Nuttall, “The Tub”, digital photograph, unpublished.

Red can float, be vaporous, toxic and tremulous. Red can discharge.

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Dan Nuttall, “Red Cloud”, acrylic on canvas, private collection.

Red can signal, exclaim, pronounce and pounce. Red can pull us off course.

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Dan Nuttall, “The Red Nest”, oil pastel on paper.

Red can dazzle, dance, trick. Red can lure, vanish and sneak up behind us.

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Dan Nuttall, “Hummingbird Gorget”, 4 x 6″ each, acrylic on paper, available.

Red can be adjacent, sitting next to bone, skin and scrapes.

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Dan Nuttall, “Grater and vertebrae”, lost.

Red can be political, isolating, terse and playful.

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Dan Nuttall, “Fifty Stars and a Maple Leaf”, 45 x 762″, acrylic on wood panel, available.

Red can be remote, automatic, whirring and mindless. Red can be a button.

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Dan Nuttall, “War Machine 3”, acrylic on paper, framed, available.
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Dan Nuttall, “War Machine 4”, acrylic on paper, framed, available.

Both War Machine 3 and 4 above are currently available and are framed. You can see more of my work HERE.

You can find out more about Propeller Gallery’s RED IMPULSE show in Toronto, February 14 – March 4, 2018,  HERE.

OPENING RECEPTION at Propeller Gallery is Thursday, February 15th, 6:30-9:30.

War Machine 4, above, will be on exhibit as part of the RED IMPULSE group show at Propeller Gallery so please drop by and see this painting as well as the diverse takes on this stimulating theme by an incredibly accomplished group of artists. The Drake Hotel is nearby as are many other Queen Street West venues so you can make a night of it.

You can also follow me on:

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/dandoesdesign/

HAPPY  VALENTINE’S  DAY!

 

A Path to Painting

On a recent trip to NYC we stopped in at Berry Campbell on West 24th, to see the Syd Solomon (1917-2004) exhibition – which was the highlight of my very limited time in Chelsea. An abstract expressionist, his work involves and energizes space.

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The paintings are perpetually sensuous and enigmatic – full of life, colour and questions. His paintings lingered in my mind – I loved their chunky organic vibrancy. See more of his work here on the Berry Campbell website: https://www.berrycampbell.com/

You can also watch a short film about Syd here: https://youtu.be/eogAWjbwcq8

And I would be remiss if I didn’t let you know that Syd’s work is rumoured to be shown this fall at Guild Hall, East Hampton. You can check in on Guild Hall’s listings as they arise here: http://www.guildhall.org/

Thank you Syd Solomon, I wish I could have met you!

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As with much of my work exposure to other artists, writers (at this moment critic Jerry Saltz comes to mind as does academic Arden Reed who recently wrote about “Slow Art”) theorists and curators plays a role in shaping future work. So I wasn’t surprised when Syd’s bold work began sifting through my brain, which is always, coincidentally, populated with ecocentric thoughts: Where are we going? What’s happening to the planet? How do artists and designers communicate ideas related to anthropogenic change and planetary fate?

Select articles by Jerry saltz here: http://nymag.com/nymag/jerry-saltz/

You can read the first chapter of Arden Reed’s book for free here: https://content.ucpress.edu/chapters/12925.ch01.pdf

The “cause” of charismatic painting would have us believe that nature, for the most part, exists in a perpetually unblemished state. Of course, in reality, anthropogenic disturbance has cast a pall over all of our planet’s ecosystems. Nature is not unhinged and separate but connected and affected.

Ecological art may be distinguished, in part, by its “ethic” – it’s trying to affirm a form of conduct that would have us behave in ways that do not harm the planet. How should such art inform? By capturing beauty? Or through direct reference to the threats we cause? Perhaps it is both. But can we live with art that hints at our future nostalgia?

How many of us have beautiful distractions on our walls – and is this enough?

Here, in this painting, the shadow of urbanity casts its long shadow on a distant coral reef.

Dan-Nuttall-Coral-Reef-after-Syd-Solomon-art-painting-web
Dan Nuttall, CORAL REEF (right), acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24″
Dan-Nuttall-Coral-Reef-after-Syd-Solomon-art-painting-2-web
Dan Nuttall, CORAL REEF (left), acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24″

The diptych, when the two images are put together, looks like this:

Dan-Nuttall-Coral-Reef-after-Syd-Solomon-art-painting-diptych

Please feel free to get in touch or share your thoughts.

INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/dandoesdesign/

 

 

A Series of Gentle Shark Attacks

A SERIES OF GENTLE SHARK ATTACKS (U.S. Election 2016)

Dan Nuttall
A Series Of Gentle Shark Attacks (Nov. 13, 2016)
acrylic on wood panel
10 x 10″

I like to alternate more “serious” work with drawing and painting “exercises” that keep me limber and light. And, as with most of my work, I don’t always know where the art is headed. Painting is an act of bringing into being, of invention; a combination of intention, randomness and explicitness, accidents and purpose. Sometimes a single stroke of the brush is enough to make a painting depart in a entirely new direction. It is usually in retrospect, occasionally days, often months later, that intention and meaning come to the surface. And in the tradition of surprises in the process of “art-making” there can be reversals and revisions; light things can become heavy, slow things can have great mass, gentle things can be savage. Thus, it seems to me that these small paintings are about the last five days and my despondency over the electing of President Trump – who seems determined to gently, casually, chew away at the fabric of U.S. society.

#Trump #sharks #POTUS

You can find out more about Dan Nuttall and his art HERE

His current solo exhibition at Lee Contemporar Art HERE.

Dan Nuttall art painting a series of gentle shark attacks

Landscapes : Reading and Memory

I have recently finished reading Elena Ferrante’s “Neapolitan Quartet” – which I thought was brilliant. As I progressed through the four novel set, which makes for a great summer read, I continually felt that I was experiencing the streets, the open windows, the smells of food, days at the beach, cramped apartments, gatherings and other interactions between the characters. Taking a step back I was intrigued at how something as simple as “text” – strings of symbols, concatenated or spaced – could conjure a fully fleshed out albeit imaginary world. The act of reading Ferrante created a flow; text became images, a fabric of sorts was sewn and stretched across my imagination.  I was delighted to find out that the Latin for “fabric” is textum. Texts can create paintings.

Shore Lines by Dan Nuttall
Dan Nuttall, “Shore Lines”, acrylic on wood panel, 4 x 8 feet
self/other/sensing/space/memory/iteration/zoo

The opposite, of course, can occur. We can look at a painting or work of art and “read” it, creating a “text” of sorts. Symbols, signs, colour, forms and other stimuli create associations and messages that reach out to confront our gaze. Sometimes the story is robust and coherent and other times it is a rough assemblage of ideas, sometimes more like sentences, often just a few words or a notion. Sometimes art presents us with a blank page and it remains unwritten, unread.

dan-nuttall-art-painting-broad-stream-nature-landscape-quadriptych-web
Dan Nuttall, “Broad Stream” (quadriptych), acrylic on canvas board, 16 x 20″ each
stream/emanation/Carr/Burchfield/light/ecology/

 

The National Gallery in London breaks down the process of reading paintings as follows:

“Reading a painting is similar to reading a book:

  • The reader decodes symbols to establish meaning
  • The reader uses inference and deduction (e.g. body language) to deepen understanding
  • A reader’s previous knowledge and experience affects their personal response”

Memory of course plays a role, intimately tied to experience, and our reading of a painting’s text ends up being diagnostic – speaking about who we are, what some of our experiences have been, what our “world views” may be.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Dan Nuttall, “Siwash”, acrylic on wood panel, 36 x 48″
Siwash/aboriginal/Vancouver/erosion/lineage/family

My first solo show at Lee Contemporary Art, in Orillia, this summer, is a retrospective of sorts, a chance to look back in time and allow viewers to read multiple texts at the same time. Or, in other words, to glance at a group of paintings or texts and ask : Is there an overarching or meta-narrative? What are the common themes?

Dan Nuttall art painting Cry Me Some Rivers diptych web
Dan Nuttall, “Cry Me Some Rivers” (diptych), acrylic on wood panel, 24 x 30″ each
rivers/symmetry/face/song/ecological art/ecology

Of course, telling someone abut a book or a painting is often both a dull and corrupting process. And yet people who visit galleries often want to know “What does this picture mean?”, “What was the artist thinking or trying to achieve?”. So, to accompany this exhibition I thought perhaps a balanced approach might work – I would say something minimal about these works – perhaps just words even, and allow the reader and/or viewer to assemble the text. These words are beneath each of the paintings above, and are intended to provide points of reflection, threads form which larger stories may be woven. These paintings, and others, will be included in “Landscapes : Reading and Memory”.

These paintings serve as a gathering of texts. From such gatherings a library of sorts arises, an edifice that is created by both the artist and those that gaze upon art. A place where both can dwell.

Please feel free to comment or to get in touch with me regarding this post. My exhibition information is as follows:

 

Dan Nuttall

LANDSCAPES: READING AND MEMORY

 August 10 – September 2, 2017

 

Lee Contemporary Art

Upper Level, 5 Peter St. S.,

Orillia, ON, L3V 5A8

(705 ) 331-3145

 

Hours: Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 10 – 4